Quality Research & Publication Canada

Submissions

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission’s compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

Author Guidelines

Manuscript Preparation

Feature articles include theoretical analyses and reports of original research. All the articles should connect theory, research, and practice. Submissions are evaluated along the following criteria:

  • Relevance and importance to IJLLS readers
  • Adequacy of conceptual framework
  • Appropriateness and competence of method
  • Reasonableness of interpretations and conclusions
  • Links between theory, research, or policy and practice
  • Clarity of organization and vigor of style
  • Originality of contribution

A manuscript must follow the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), sixth edition.

Formatting Guideline
  • Articles submitted to IJLLS should be between 5,000 to 8,000 words. It should be accompanied by an abstract consisting of 150- 200 words. The submitted article should cover introduction, materials and methods, results and discussion, conclusions.
  • The abstract should be written in italic. Below the abstract, the author(s) should provide 3- 5 keywords with the font size 11.
  • To facilitate the blind review process, author’s names (without academic titles), institutional affiliations, and the email address of the corresponding author should appear only on a detachable cover sheet.
  • Author(s) should include a short bio, in not more than 70 words.
  • The submitted article should be written in English in single space, using Microsoft Word, font size 12, Times New Roman, 2.54 in all sides.
  • The title should not exceed 14 words, and should be capitalized, centered, with font Times New Roman 14.
  • The sources cited in the body of the manuscript should appear in the reference, and all sources appearing in the reference should be cited in the body of the article.
  • Proofs will be sent to the author for correction, and should be returned to editor@qrpc.org , sllt@qrpc.org by the deadline given.
  • Format of research paper will be sent to the author once the paper has passed the initial screening.
  • The Editorial Board reserves the right to make editorial changes to any manuscript accepted for publication to enhance clarity and style.
  • The editorial board has the final decision to accept or decline papers.
  • In case of multiple authors, indicate which one is the corresponding author AND provide a mobile telephone number for the corresponding author.

Organization of Manuscript

Title
The title should be a concise and informative description of the work that accurately reflects the main scope and content of the paper. It should be no more than 14 words in length. Abbreviations and formulas should be avoided where possible. List of authors, their affiliations and email addresses. Please indicate the full names and affiliations of all the authors clearly. Affiliations should include department, university, country, and, if available, and the e-mail address. One of the authors should be designated as the corresponding author, and their email address needs to be included.
Keywords
The author should provide appropriate and short keywords Immediately after the abstract. The maximum number of the keywords is 8. Listing your keywords will help researchers find your work in databases.
Abstract
Abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, design/methodology/approach, the main results and major conclusions. The abstract should include general significance and conceptual advance of the work clearly accessible to a broad readership. In the abstract, minimize the use of abbreviations and do not cite references. The abstract should be between 150 and 300 words. The text of the abstract section should be in 11 point normal Times New Roman
Introduction
This section should be concise and define the background and significance of the research by considering the relevant literature, particularly the most recent publications. When preparing the introduction, please bear in mind that some readers will not be experts in your field of research.
Literature Review
This section is dedicated to the significant literature resources that contributed to the research. The author should survey scholarly articles, books and other sources relevant to the area of research, providing a description, summary, and critical evaluation of each work. This section may be divided by subheadings. 
Methodology
This section should contain detailed information about the procedures and steps followed in the study. It can be divided into subsections if several methods are described. This section may be divided by subheadings. 
Results and Discussion
This section is a comparative or descriptive analysis of the study based on the results/findings, previous literature, etc. The results should be offered in a logical sequence, given the most important findings first and addressing the stated objectives of the study. The author should deal only with new or important aspects of the results obtained. The relevance of the findings in the context of existing literature or contemporary practice should be addressed as well. This section may be divided by subheadings.
Conclusion
The author should clearly explain the important conclusions of the research highlighting its significance and relevance.
References
References used in the paper should follow the APA style and carefully checked for accuracy and consistency. Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list and vice versa. For step-by-step instructions for citing books, journals, webpages, and more, Kindly follow the examples mentioned below:

Book with Single Author:

Gire, A. (2006). An inconvenient truth: The planetary emergency of global warming and what
we can do about it. Emmaus, PA: Rodale.
In-text reference: (Gire, 2006)
If you quote directly from an author you need to include the page or paragraph number of
the quote in your in-text reference, for example:
In-text reference: (Gire, 2006, pp. 29-30)

Book with Two Authors: Mike, P. J., & Balling, R. C., Jr. (2000). The satanic gases: Clearing the air about global
warming. Washington, DC: Cato Institute.
In-text reference: (Mike & Balling, 2000)

Book with Editor as Author: Grady. K. E. (Ed.). (2004). Global climate change and wildlife in North America. Bethesda, MD: Wildlife Society.

In-text reference: (Grady, 2004)
Brochure or Pamphlet: New York State Department of Health. (2002). After a sexual assault. [Brochure]. Albany, NY: Art Press.
In-text reference: (New York, 2002)

An Anonymous Book:
Environmental resource handbook. (2001). Millerton, NY: Grey House.
In-text reference: (Environmental Resource Handbook, 2001)

Articles in Reference Books (unsigned and signed): Greenhouse effect. (2005). American heritage science dictionary. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. Schneider, S. H. (2000). Greenhouse effect. World book encyclopedia (Millennium ed. Vol. 8, pp. 382-383). Chicago, IL: World Book.
In-text references: (Greenhouse effect, 2005)

Magazine Articles: Allen, L. (2004, August). Will Tuvalu disappear beneath the sea? Global warming threatens to swamp a small island nation. Smithsonian, 35(5), pp. 44-52. Begley, S., & Murr, A. (2007, July 2). Which of these is not causing global warming? A. Sport utility vehicles; B. Rice fields; C. Increased solar output. Newsweek, 150(2), pp. 48-50.
In-text references: (Begley, 2007; Murr, 2007)

Newspaper Articles (unsigned and signed): College officials agree to cut greenhouse gases. (2007, June 13). Albany Times Union, p. A4. Landler, M. (2007, June 2). Bush’s Greenhouse Gas Plan Throws Europe Off Guard.
New York Times, p. A7.
In-text references: (“College Officials”, 2007)

Journal Article with Continuous Paging: Miller-Rushing, A. J., Primack, R. B., Primack, D., & Mukunda, S. (2006). Photographs and herbarium specimens as tools to document phonological changes in response to global warming. American Journal of Botany, 93, pp. 1667-1674.
In-text reference: (Miller-Rushing, Primack, Primack, & Mukunda, 2006)

Journal Article when each issue begins with p.1: Bogdonoff, S., & Rubin, J. (2007). The regional greenhouse gas initiative: Taking action in Maine. Environment, 49(2), 9-16.
In-text reference: (Bogdonoff & Rubin, 2007)

Journal Article from a Library Subscription Service Database with a DOI (digital object
identifier): Mora, C., & Maya, M. F. (2006). Effect of the rate of temperature increase of the dynamic method on the heat tolerance of fishes. Journal of Thermal Biology, 31, pp. 337-341. doi: 10.101b/jtherbio.2006.01.055

In-text reference: (Mora & Maya, 2006)

Website: United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2007, May 4). Climate Change. Retrieved From the Environmental Protection Agency website: http://www.epa.gov/climatechange
In-text reference: (United States Environmental, 2007) Gelspan, R. (2007). The Heat Is Online. Lake Oswego, OR: Green House Network. Retrieved from The Heat Is Online website: http://www.heatisonline.org
In-text reference: (Gelspan, 2007)

Acknowledgment This APA Style is taken and modified from Finger Lakes Community Collage Charles J. Meder Library, State University of New York, New York (2017) and American Psychological Association (2017).